Incident Prevention Magazine

John Morton, CUSP

Starting From the Ground Up

Starting From the Ground Up

Whenever we are fortunate enough to see a competent climber working off of a pole or tower, it can be favorably compared to watching a well-oiled machine at work. Each part of the body is coordinated and working together. A person with no understanding of the business might think climbing is something anyone can do. It is not. That climber has, more than likely, spent numerous hours learning his craft and practicing it day in and day out during the course of his duties. Even that climber who looks so graceful had to start somewhere, and that is what we are going to look at in this article – how learning to climb at the bottom of a pole or structure can make you a more competent climber at the top.

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Parrish Taylor

Learning Leadership: Leadership Skill Set 3: Self-Motivation

A fundamental requirement of leaders is the ability to motivate. A leader must lead by example by first motivating himself. Once that’s been accomplished, a leader can then work to motivate others through the art of emotional intelligence.

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Bart Castle

The Authority to Stop Work

The Authority to Stop Work

Since its founding in 1984 as an electric utility contractor company, co-founder Steve Standish has always considered Standard Utility Construction an organization concerned about safety. Specifically, Standard responded to a fatality in 2003 by developing formal safety processes and documents. These included assigning employees to full-time safety-related work; increased emphasis and time devoted to safety meetings and incident response; deepened training and even more extensive use of appropriate PPE, often before an item was formally required by regulation; working toward formal OSHA certifications for Standard’s safety efforts; and a review to make certain all company documents regarding safety contained language emphasizing that no employee had to complete work he or she believed was unsafe.

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Gary Coleman, CHST, CSP, CUSP, OHST, STSC

Foundation Drilling Safety: The Aldridge Electric Story of Success

Foundation Drilling Safety: The Aldridge Electric Story of Success

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, between 4,500 and 5,000 people are killed in the U.S. workforce each year. Approximately 20 percent of those workplace fatalities are in the construction industry. According to OSHA, the four leading hazards that contribute to fatal injuries in construction are falls, electrocution, struck by object and caught-in/between.

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Jim Vaughn, CUSP

Train the Trainer 101: ASTM F855 Grounding Equipment Specs Made Simple

I define safety as identifying and managing hazards to prevent incidents. That is accomplished using a broad array of tools and rules for the employer and workforce. Good safety professionals and trainers have to go beyond the OSHA and MSHA regulatory text to completely understand the rules. That is where preambles to the standards, interpretations, CPLs and consensus standards are needed.

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Danny Raines, CUSP

Voice of Experience: Training for the Qualified Employee

Training is required by OSHA and all employees should follow proper training, but the unfortunate truth is that doesn’t always happen, resulting in accidents, contacts and fatalities. OSHA is very specific about defining what qualifies employees to work on and near energized conductors and equipment energized at greater than 50 volts. To be qualified to work on systems considered primary voltages greater than 600 volts, the mandated training is markedly more intense because of the requirements for such things as knowledge of component specialization, procedures such as insulate or isolate, and the personal protective measures and personal equipment used, among others. The ideal trainer is OSHA-authorized and intimately familiar with federal standards and expectations, and has industry experience as well as a broad knowledge of consensus standards and contemporary practices related to the topics being covered. Electric utility employees are a tough group, and they will be tough on an instructor who has no utility experience. Instructors should not deliver training material simply via PowerPoint presentations or similar delivery methods. Examples and accident histories should be incorporated into the training. Additionally, OSHA requires field observations in order for employees to prove their proficiency in the training subject. After training is complete and an employee has proven proficiency, the employer can state the employee is qualified for the task.

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